MVP Mookie Betts Drives Home The Importance Of Giving Back

Mookie Betts is generously listed a 5’ 9”, 180 pounds, but the man can eat. He has been known to go out to dinner, then get home and order delivery.


So after Game 2 of the World Series, in which Betts went 3–4 and his Red Sox took a 2–0 series lead over the Dodgers, he was thrilled to see the frankly preposterous amount of Dominican food awaiting him and five others in his Back Bay apartment.




He had placed the order with David Ortiz, who had apparently thought Betts was feeding the 40-man roster.


Mookie and Cam Lewis, his best friend since seventh grade, insisted they could eat it all. They stuffed themselves then admitted defeat.


Normally they would feast on leftovers the next day, but they had early flights to Los Angeles for Game 3. Instead, they decided to give away the remaining food.


Lewis remembered the line of people who usually sleep wrapped in blankets, shivering on cardboard boxes, abutting the Boston Public Library on nearby Boylston Street. It was nearing 2 a.m. and 37 degrees—but that was true for the homeless people, as well. So the two wrapped themselves in three layers of down and wool and headed out into the night.


They gently woke a few people to offer them dinner, and within a few minutes close to two dozen men and women were eating.


“Thank you so much,” someone said. “We were hungry all day.”


The experience moved the 26-year old and his friend to return on a later date with blankets and warm clothing.


When asked by Sports Illustrated and other outlets about the night, the outfielder has declined to comment.


What makes this story so lovely is that none of the people they served recognized Betts. No one cared that he will likely be the MVP of the American League, that his team won a franchise-record 108 games this season and is two wins away from a title.


Betts did not act in his capacity as one of the most popular players in the MLB. He acted in his capacity as a human, someone who knows the importance of empathy, the value of humility, and the reward for selflessly serving others.

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